Top 10 Gen Y Career Bloggers

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After an extensive hunt for the best “career bloggers,” I was amazed to find how many young bloggers there are out there who focus on the job search and workplace (many of them specifically targeting recent grads and college students). The problem is that no one, not even me, has the time to keep tabs on all of them. Here are 10 bloggers who immediately stood out as being the most knowledgeable with an overwhelming sincerity in wanting to help fellow Gen Y’ers:

  1. Ms. Career Girl by Nicole Crimaldi. This Sex in the City “esque” site is not only pretty, but filled with excellent content. From her “Senior Series” geared toward those about to graduate and those who just graduated to articles on topics, such as working in Big City, Nicole will keep you coming back. Look out for the job search guide she has in the works.
  2. Corn on the Job by Rich DeMatteo. With its witty name and an author who has a Master’s in Human Resources, it’s filled with colorful advice you can trust. There are articles from navigating career fairs to whether or not you should dress up for phone interviews. And hear from his guest bloggers (aka "Corn Heads").
  3. Grad to Great by Anne Brown and Beth Zefo. This blogging team only writes a couple times a month, but their topics are worth the wait. As the name implies, they’ll help you “achieve and sustain career success.”
  4. The Savvy Grad by Christina. This young grad’s goal is “to create a place for graduates to share their experiences and help each other navigate the unclear path between college student and young professional.” Her entries extend beyond just plain career advice into issues regarding exercise and travel. 
  5. Awesome and Unemployed by Stefanie. The title of this blog unfortunately applies to many recent grads. But with Stefanie’s six years of HR experience, she can help in the job hunt. She admits to knowing the feeling of being rejected by job after job and wants to relieve some of the resulting anxiety.
  6. Life After College by Jenny Blake. Jenny’s blog (well, really a website) is filled with a variety of resources: video posts, podcasts, and job coaching. She works at Google and even wrote an article titled “10 Reasons I Love My Cube” with a picture of it. Very interesting reads!
  7. One Day, One Job by Willy Franzen. Every day Willy profiles a company and highlights their open entry-level positions. Great site to make an RSS feed for.
  8. Professional Studio 365 by Emily Bennington. Professional Studio 365 helps career newbies become “rock stars.” She focuses on how to excel in the first year of your first job.
  9. Jobacle by Andrew G.R. Get useful 411, expert interviews and a forum to speak your mind on everything work related. Andrew knows how discouraging the job search can be. His first job paid $14,000/year!
  10. Unemploymentality by John Henion and Tania Khadder. The tag line on this blog was enough to get me reading: “Lifestyles of the penniless and downtrodden.” Ya. That’s me! And may be you. Check out the rants of these unemployed bloggers and their unemployed visitors.

Take your career by the reigns by bookmarking these sites or, better yet, adding them to your RSS feed!

Are there any young career bloggers you recommend?

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About the Author: Michelle Barbeau

Michelle Barbeau graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2006 with a B.A. in English and minor in Professional Writing. She is currently in graduate school working toward a Masters in Rhetoric and Writing. Michelle has worked as an editor and writer for four years and teaches Freshman Composition at a local university. She also considers herself an authority in resume writing and acing the GRE, and provides free resume critiques to potential clients. To learn more about Michelle's resume critiques and read more of her insightful career expertise, check out her career advice blog.

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